Sleep Deprivation Horror Stories

Sleep Deprivation Horror Stories

Sleep Deprivation Horror Stories– Sleep So Bad It’s SCARY

You tossed and turned all night long. You twisted and writhed under the covers trying your best to get comfortable. You obsessively checked the glowing numbers on the clock, and your mounting dread for the following day threatened to eat you alive. We’ve all got sleep deprivation horror stories, and we all know what happens when we fail to get the sleep we need to function. Defeated, you drag yourself from bed at the rude blaring of your alarm, and you proceed to zombie your way through your daily tasks.

We’ve all been there. The effects of even just one night of minimal, poor quality sleep are glaring. You may feel drowsy during the day, lack energy, experience slowed thinking, and even have an irritable mood that affects your interactions with loved ones or coworkers. Sleep deprivation is no joke, and according to the American Sleep Apnea Association, an estimated 50 to 70 million Americans of all ages and socioeconomic classes are affected by sleep-related problems, such as sleep deprivation.

What is Sleep Deprivation?

Sleep deprivation simply means getting less than the necessary amount of sleep, which for adults, ranges from seven to nine hours per night. That said, when it comes to great restful sleep, it’s not all about quantity. For that reason, the terms sleep deficiency or sleep insufficiency are often used to describe the factors that keep a person from waking up feeling rested and refreshed.

Sleep deprivation horror stories

Types of Sleep Deprivation

The sleep deprivation a person experiences can be broken down into different categories based on circumstances, primarily the duration of the person’s lack of sleep.

Acute Sleep Deprivation Acute sleep deprivation refers to a short period of time, generally a few days or less, during which a person experiences a significant reduction in the amount of sleep achieved.

Chronic Sleep Deprivation Also known as insufficient sleep syndrome, chronic sleep deprivation is defined as curtailed sleep persisting for three months or more.

Chronic Sleep Deficiency– This can describe ongoing sleep deprivation or insufficient sleep that occurs as a result of sleep fragmentation or other disruptions.

 

Sleep Deprivation Symptoms

The obvious signs of sleep deprivation include excessive sleepiness during the day, as well as reduced ability to concentrate, slowed thinking, and sometimes even mood changes. The lack of sleep can manifest itself through a variety of symptoms such as:

  • Slowed cognitive thinking
  • Reduced attention span
  • Lack of energy
  • Worsened ability to remember things
  • Poor or risky decision making
  • Feelings of stress, anxiety, or irritability

Symptoms are affected by the extent and duration of a person’s experience with sleep deprivation, and their consequences can be serious.

Chronic sleep deprivation can contribute to various health issues, as healthy sleep plays a vital role in the functioning of essentially all systems within the human body. Studies suggest that sleep deprivation can potentially contribute to issues like:

  • Diabetes
  • Cardiovascular disease
  • Obesity
  • Hormonal abnormalities
  • Immunodeficiency
  • Mental health disorders

Sufficient sleep is necessary for us to feel our best as we move throughout our days, and it’s also an imperative piece of the puzzle when it comes to achieving our greatest personal health. It’s important in terms of quality of life as well. In addition to having far-reaching effects on the person affected, sleep deprivation in general has a profound effect on society at large. For instance, according to the CDC, as many as 6,000 deaths each year are the result of drowsy drivers. Additionally, sleep deprivation has been estimated to contribute to hundreds of billions of dollars in added healthcare costs. Talk about scary!

If you’re experiencing sleep deprivation yourself, talk to your doctor. You may also consider upgrading your sleep set up with the perfect adjustable bed custom-tailored to your specific sleep needs. Find one today through Flexabed!

Sleep Soundly with These Ways to Wind Down Before Bed

You wouldn’t try to bake a cake without preheating the oven or jump into an intense workout without a warmup, so why go to bed without taking steps to adequately prepare yourself for restful, productive sleep? If you want to drift off to dreamland and get the most out of those (hopefully) eight blissful hours– try incorporating these ways to wind down before bed into your bedtime rituals.

Establish a Nightly Routine

Did you know that disruptions to your daily routine can affect the quality and duration of your sleep at night? What does getting ready for bed entail for you? Maybe you run through your skincare routine, read a little bit, or go through a guided meditation. Establishing a routine with patterns that help signal to the brain that it’s bedtime, can go a long way. Another great tip is to set a bedtime for yourself, and do your best to stick to it. We are creatures of habit, and our bodies respond well to healthy patterns we set for ourselves.

Really, the importance of a bedtime routine goes all the way back to childhood. Parents can attest that consistent bedtime routines have the power to relieve cranky infants, often helping children to fall asleep faster and wake up less often throughout the night.

Don’t Stare at the Clock

Believe it or not, obsessing about the time is not going to be a productive catalyst for great sleep. It’s best to turn your alarm clock away from you, or turn the brightness way down on your phone when you’re in bed, so you aren’t tempted to watch the time tick by.

Sleep Soundly with These Ways to Wind Down Before Bed

Focus on Your Breath

If you’re trying to get to sleep, but you’re feeling anxious or having a hard time relaxing, try some simple breathing exercises. Just a few minutes of slow, intentional breathing can work wonders for calming the mind and body. This is a great technique to employ in all sorts of scenarios, but can also be particularly helpful in winding down for bed. Ready to try it? Check out these simple breathing techniques for sleep.

Take a Warm Bath

Your body begins to produce melatonin in the evening to help prepare you for sleep. This is a part of the body’s hormonal changes that work with your sleep-wake cycle, and as the melatonin production begins, your core body temperature begins to drop. For this reason, sometimes mimicking a nighttime drop in body temp with a warm soak in the tub can trigger the brain’s message that signals it’s time for sleep. Baths are also notoriously relaxing, and an excellent way to unwind before bed.

Prep Your Bedroom

If you want to achieve restful and productive sleep, it helps to set yourself up for success. Prepare your bedroom to be the best possible environment for great sleep by removing clutter that can cause stress, keep it cool and dark, and ensure your bedding is comfortable and supportive.

Having the right setup is an imperative component of getting great sleep. Do you have the best possible bed and mattress combo for you? Great bedding? The right pillows? Check out our customizable adjustable beds by Flexabed if it’s time for an upgrade in that department.

These ways to wind down before bed can help you find a good nighttime rhythm that promotes better sleep on an ongoing basis. Figuring out a routine that works best for you, and tailoring it to your personal needs and preferences can make all the difference. We know once you get into the right bedtime habits, you’ll be so glad you did. Cheers to consistency, great sleep, and sweet dreams– especially in a Flexabed!

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